NNYC News

NNYC 150th Journal
Monday
Jun162014

Frank Grundman's Sailing Legacy

Frank Grundman's E Scow "Rascal" in the 1960's

This year we received a packet of memorabilia from Betty Grundman, wife of the late Frank Grundman.  Betty now lives in Australia.  Included was a complete scrapbook of his 1953 ILYA Class Y Championship.  Neenah-Nodaway hosted the ILYA Regatta that year and complete news accounts of the regatta and Frank's efforts can be found HERE

Frank's M20 "Rascal" submarining in 1977Frank's Y boat "Rascal" in the 1950's

 Some of you old salts may remember competing with Frank.  Almost without exception his boats were named Rascal.  He sailed in a number of classes - A Scow, E Scow, Y Boat and M20, taking trophies in all of them.  The following a listing of his exploits and accomplishments with the NNYC:

 

 

 

Grundman Trophy Wins

     

1950

NNYC Trophy

   

Y

1951

James H. Kimberly Trophy

     

1951

Jack Kimberly Trophy

     

1952

F. B. Whiting

   

 

1952

James H. Kimberly Trophy

     

1952

Jack Kimberly Trophy

     

1953

James H. Kimberly Trophy

     

1953

Jack Kimberly Trophy

     

1953

ILYA Class Y Champion

   

Y

1955

NNYC Trophy

   

Y

1956

Mrs. Ernst Mahler Three Course Regatta

   

E

1958

Mrs. J. A. Kimberly

     

1960

NNYC Trophy

   

Y

1961

Mowry Smith

   

E

1962

Mowry Smith

   

E

1962

A. C. Gilbert Perpetual Challenge

   

E

1964

Rascal Trophy

   

M20

1965

Rascal Trophy

   

M20

1965

M20 Perpetual Trophy

   

M20

1966

F. B. Whiting

     

1966

Rascal Trophy

   

M20

1966

M20 Perpetual Trophy

   

M20

1972

Wildfire

   

M20

1973

Rascal Trophy

   

M20

1974

Greg Menn

   

Div 1

1974

Wildfire

   

M20

1974

M20 Perpetual Trophy

   

M20

1975

Greg Menn

   

Div 1

1975

Sage

   

A

1975

F. B. Whiting

     

1975

M20 Perpetual Trophy

   

M20

1976

Sage

   

A

1977

White Hot Trophy

   

Laser

1978

White Hot Trophy

   

Laser

1978

Carol Heyl

     

1978

Bruce Heyl Trophy

     

1979

F. B. Whiting

     

1979

J.M. Sargent Trophy

   

 

1980

Greg Menn

   

Div 1

1980

Shamrock First to Finish

     

 

As you can see, Frank was an accomplished sailor - his sailing legacy lives on engraved on our NNYC trophies.

 

Doug Hatch - NNYC Historian and Treasurer

Tuesday
May272014

Learning to Sail on Lake Winnebago

Learning to sail has been nurtured by the Neenah-Nodaway Yacht Club since 1926 when S.F. Shattuck, Bill Kellett, along with J.C. and A. K. Kimberly determined the need for educating youngsters in the art and science of sailing. These leaders established a Junior Yacht Racing Section of the Yacht Club and invited students from the St. Thomas troop of Boy Scouts and the Boys Brigade. The club acquired three 18' dinghies, and the students were taught proper care and given instruction after a blackboard talk on the principal points of sailing. 

Documents of interest -

A charter for the Junior Program was developed indicating responsibilities of the NNYC and the students (note - only boys were invited - that wouldn't happen today!)   A Junior Racing Program was developed and  participants raced each week and a championship was awarded.

A defined application requiring parental permission, along with the requirement that a child must be able to swim 50 yards was created. 

Commodore Jack Kimberly made note of the success of the Junior Yacht Racing Section in his August 28, 1926 letter to the general membership.

The Fox Valley Sailing School plays an important role in our community educating youngsters and adults (girls, boys, women and men) in the sport of sailing.  The current sailing school was founded in 1958 by John Galloway and supported by the Breakfast Optimists Club of Neenah, which made the initial donation of Opti's.  The school was initially created to enable children to learn to sail, but by the 1970's the school expanded to include lessons for adults, as which it continues today and sports fleets of Opti's, 420's and Flying Scots.

Doug Hatch, NNYC treasurer and Historian

Monday
May122014

What's in a name? - - reprinted from the 2005 Offshore Breeze Winter Issue

I don't know about you, but I had to take a second run at naming our sailboat.  You don't get that chance with the kids, and I wanted a unique name that "fit" the boat and our family.  The first name, Second Wind, was doomed the moment my wife and I saw another boat on Winnebago with that name...and then another.  Then we found out through BoatUS that Second Wind was the 2nd most common name for a sailboat!  So we rechristened her Okoboji, after my hometown and the lake I grew up on in Iowa. 

This winter (2005) I have been cataloging the NNYC trophies, complete with a photo and table by year of the skippers, crew, and yacht names that were awarded trophies.  (This is on the website here).  Going over each trophy gives one a sense of the NNYC history of yacht racing on Lake Winnebago.  Pillars of industry abound . . . trophies named after the Kimberly family, the Gilberts, the Mahlers, the Sensenbrenners, the Moons, the Bergstroms and many others.  Trophies in memorial to George Gilbert, Horace DuBois, Peter Greenman, Gus Woerner, Greg Menn and Eric Larson are found in the archives.

But what about yacht names?  Who hasn't taken a stroll through a marina and looked at the names of yachts?  The name of a boat tells you something personal about the owner and the craft.  From collecting data from the trophies, it is apparent that the members of NNYC want you to know something about the yacht's personality from the naming.  That said, here is what I found:

Names that reflect sailing weather:  Puff, Windy, Stormalong, Squall, Windmill, Mad Zephyr, White Cap, Tempest, Blowing Wild

Names that portray a positive attitude: Bucko, Jubilee, Sunshine, Sunny Side Up, Sunburst, Sunrise

Names that tie to our valley:  Foxy I and Foxy II, Winnefox I and Winnefox II, Winnebago

Names that refer to gosh knows what:  Ondine, Nepenthe, Aeolus, Glyndwr, Orinda, Cajibo, Eeyore, Nazgul, Jolo, Gwenol, Tuanlea

Names that are after the skipper's wife, or females:  Sally II, Suzy Too, Christina, Erica, Rachel, Bethy Boo, Sacajawea ( I thought there would be more of these - and I can't guarantee that the yachts were named after a spouse, either!)

Names derived from movies or other media:   Ol' Yeller, Gone with the Wind, The Sting, Splash Dance, Blazing Sails, Pogo, Little Lulu, Moby Dick, Great Pumpkin, Pookah

Names that you wonder if these people should be sailing:  Dry Rot, Miss Fortune, Jinx, Rock Bottom, Eight Ball, So What, Confusion, Pushover II, Going Over, Ro-Dam-U-Row, Last Chance, Goon

Names that are intended to throw the fear of Neptune into the competition:   Rogue, Starboard Crunch, Sock-It-To- Em, Raptor, Marauder, Stinger, El Toro, Crunch, Victory, Full Throttle

Names that Play on family names: Hy-de-Ho, Tom Hyde;, Moby Dick, Dick Roeder; Les Work, Les Perry; P.S., Patsy and Sumner Parker, KayGee, Katherine Gilbert; Algee, Alice Gilbert, Bullshipper- Guy Bull

Names that represent sailing tactics:  Jibe

Names that are a bit playful:  Duppy Cups, Old Dud, Artful Dodger, A.T. Yate, Creeping Charlie, Myassis Dragon, Flutterby, Who-Dat?, Chickcharney, Goly-Kell

Best name for a racing sailboat (author's choice):  Bud Dick's Non Sequitur, from the Latin "it does not follow".

Trivia Contest:  Which of our current members got their name on a trophy for sailing Go-Go Girl?? First e-mail with the correct answer gets 20 seconds added to their NRHF (assuming the Rear Commodore goes along.  One person is disqualified, and you know who you are!!)

Doug Hatch, NNYC treasurer and historian

Monday
Apr282014

Sandbaggers or Gravel-wagons (And how to tell them from a scow)

by Doug Hatch and Jonathan Coultas

From the 1870s to the end of the 19th century, the primary racing yachts on Lake Winnebago were of a type known as "sandbaggers" and sometimes called "gravel-wagons".  These boats derived their name from the use of bags of sand or gravel carried as movable ballast.  The gravel became favored since it did not absorb water like the sand.  At each tack everyone but the skipper and the sheet tenders would transfer the 50 lb. bags to the new windward side.  This type of boat as well as heavier fin-keeled boats predated the arrival of the scow on Lake Winnebago.  The scow would eventually take over as the dominant sailboat on the lake and would become the iconic symbol of inland sailing and racing.

The sandbagger boats were of a classic east coast design, likely heavily influenced by the "Wizard of Bristol", Nathaniel Herreschoff,  - graceful bowsprit sloops with huge gaffed mainsails attached to booms which hung over the stern as far as the bowsprit hung over the bow.  Often the length of the sailplan was double the overall length of the boat.  As the design matured on Lake Winnebago, more and more canvas was hung on the spars - with multiple jibs and a gaff topsail.  As we learned in the last journal entry, sail area on these boats of no more than 26' LWL reached up to 725 square feet!  In contrast, scows have the flat nose, no fixed bowsprit, and are thin "skimming dish" hulls with not nearly as drastic of a boom overhang.  See pictures below to note the differences.

The sandbagger "Katleen" circa 1898The A scow "Tecumseh" circa 1900 The picture below depicts three of these sandbaggers - the "Carrie Morgan", "Niobe," and "Penaqua" - which sailed out of Oshkosh and competed with the Neenah Yacht Club's "Myra Belle", "Mermaid," and "Albatross."  Note the large amount of canvas piled on these boats!  There are other sandbaggers depicted in our Early Photo Gallery.  You can also check out Mystic Seaport's "Annie," a sandbagger from 1880 that still sails. 

Monday
Apr142014

Rules of the Race Course

By the late 1890s the Nodaway Yacht Club had been established, and as part of the third purpose for forming the club (to establish a standard code of rules and signals for the lake)1 they desired to come to an agreement with other yacht clubs on the lake as to rules governing regattas.  At this time there was no standard governing body for the rules of sailing so clubs had their own local rules.  The International Yacht Racing Union (IYRU), which later became the International Sailing Federation (ISAF) that now governs the Racing Rules of Sailing was not formed until 1906.2  Individual club rules could differ and make interclub racing difficult.  A standard was needed.

Recognizing this need, in October 1897 Representatives of both the Nodaway and Oshkosh Yacht Clubs met in Oshkosh at the Hotel Athearn to develop rules governing races between them for 1898-1899.  Present from the Nodaway Yacht Club were J.C. Kimberly, W. Z. Stuart and W. L. Davis.  Notice how the Nodaway Yacht Club's efforts towards a one-design concept influence the following, especially in the actual document.

I will summarize key points - -

a) Racing (waterline) length of not less than 25' and no more than 26', overall dimension not to exceed 32'.

b) Sail area not to exceed 725' with the jib to be not less than 3/10ths of the area of the mainsail.

c) There shall be a measurer, Judge and timer from each club plus a third party present.

d)There shall be no racing for MONEY  by any club boat on Lake Winnebago.

e) Ballast shall be declared at the beginning of the season.  The measurer will place 900 pounds of dead weight in lieu of crew where in his judgment the proper trim of the boat is obtained.   The captain retains the right to move this weight forward or aft by up to 1'. This will determine the waterline which is exclusive of the rudder and rudderpost.

f) Time handicap for differing lengths is determined by using the Herreschoff table found in the Nodaway Yacht Club manual.

Here is a copy of the actual document for the 1898-1899 Racing Rules between Oshkosh and Nodaway Yacht Clubs.  Doug Hatch - NNYC Treasurer and Historian  

Sources:

1- Kimberly, James C. / The History of the Neenah-Nodaway Yacht Club of Neenah, Wisconsin: an account of yacht racing on Lake Winnebago from 1859 to 1957
(1957)

2-"The Official Website of the International Sailing Federation." About ISAF. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Apr. 2014. <http://www.sailing.org/167.php>.